Things to do in Portland this weekend: (05/04/12 – 05/06/12) “Cinco De Lebowski VII Festival & Object Stories”


“An annual tradition for Big Lebowski lovers and White Russian-starved alcoholics alike, Cinco de Lebowski—hosted by local podcasters cortandfatboy—screens the Coen brothers’ classic film, encourages Dude-approved costumes, and offers live music from Here Come Dots and Rich Layton and the Troublemakers.” By EH from the Portland Mercury (here)

Where:  Bagdad Theater |3702SE Hawthorne

When:   Fri, May 4th, 8pm. | $3-10

Phone: 225-5555




“A collaboration with the Northwest Film Center, Miracle Theatre Group, and Write Around Portland, Object Stories addresses the subtle but vital power of an object to compel a narrative and provides an interactive platform meant to transform the public’s perception of “the archive” and their relationship to it. The show includes a soundproof booth, where you can bring in a personal item to speak about, having your voice recorded and photo taken, and then have your story added to the museum’s archives.” from the the Portland Mercury (here)

Where: Portland Art Museum| 1219 SW Park

When: ongoing

Phone: 503 226-2811

Website: ;




Glenn Adamson Quote: “Of course, big corporations are just as adept…”

“Of course, big corporations are just as adept at manipulating the rhetoric of sustainability as young makers. But craft does have a special advantage. In the effort to promote more self-aware ways of living, the simple act of making by hand signifies direct engagement with an object, and therefore a degree of personal responsibility. Certainly, not every craft object is made sustainably; we have to get real about that. But the lesson of postmodernism is that the power of the image is not to be denied. It’s not enough to make things responsibly; we need to call on mass media to constantly remind the public of what responsibility might look like.” (023)

An excerpt from Glenn Adamson’s response to the questions: Is there a sustainability aesthetic? If so, how would you describe it, and which artists exemplify it?

“The Big Questions with Glenn Adamson: What Responsibility Might Look Like.” American Craft. Vol. 72, No. 02, April/May 2012. pg 023.

55. “The Everyday” edited by Stephen Johnstone.

There will be a First Thursday opening reception this Thursday, May 3rd, from 6-8:30pm, for Heidi Schwegler‘s new body of work, The Known World–a suite of objects, images, and videos–at the Chambers@916 gallery. Here’s a little background for the show from her Artist Statement:

“For the past two years, Heidi Schwegler positioned herself as a tourist in China, Iceland, Argentinaand Southern California. In exploring each environment, she became sensitive to the notion of perceptual blindness, a phenomenon which makes it difficult to understand what one sees in an environment that is very disconnected from the familiar, which can feel very alienating. To ground herself, she sought patterns in the unnoticed and discarded objects that exist on the periphery, rather than the spectacle of tourist attractions. Objects and situations that are normally overlooked, like a discarded mattress or duct tape holding down a mannequin, became instantly evocative. These experiences ultimately became the springboard for this body of work, which speaks of what is known but no longer seen.” From (here)

We are extremely excited to see this show! Last October, Heidi Schwegler started off OCAC’s lunch-time talk series with an amazing presentation about her sabbatical and artist residencies.  Most of her presentation covered her explorations and revelations about art and the everyday, and, while we did see some of the objects that she had made (which again were amazing!), there wasn’t enough time to talk about her whole body of work that came out of this period. Fortunately, we have that opportunity starting this Thursday! Don’t miss it!

The show will run through June 23, 2012.

Staying on this theme of the “everyday,” the library pick for this week is The Everyday edited by Stephen Johnstone. It would be an excellent book to check out to prepare for Schwegler’s show in order contextualize her work with respect to the ongoing collective discussion around the concept of the everyday that has been going on for well over half a century. Or, perhaps your interest might be peaked about it upon seeing The Known World.

According to the Publisher, this collection of essays, excerpts, and other writings tracks the “range of contemporary art engaged with the everyday and its antecedents in the work of Surrealists, Situationists, the Fluxus group, and conceptual and feminist artists of the 1960s and 1970s. This art shows a recognition of ordinary dignity or the accidentally miraculous, an engagement with a new kind of anthropology, an immersion in the pleasures of popular culture, or a meditation on what happens when nothing happens. The celebration of the everyday has oppositional and dissident overtones, offering a voice to the silenced and proposing possibilities for change “(from here).

Check it out!

Things to do in Portland this weekend: (04/28/12 – 04/29/12) “Stumptown Comics Festival & Willamette Week’s Fifth Annual Eat Mobile Festival”


“In celebration of the release of Peter Bagge’s newest comics series, RESET, Dark Horse Comics and Bridge City Comics present the 2012 Stumptown Comics Festival kickoff event — a Friday night Drink and Draw for visiting and local artists, publishers, and all festival-goers!” from (here)

Where:  Bridge City Comics |3725 N Mississippi Ave

When:   Fri, April 27th, 7-10pm | FREE



“Sample some of Portland’s best food carts and learn the science behind the food on OMSI’s Culinary Science Stage.

With more than 400 mobile eateries selling their tasty goods within our city limits, Portland has become an international destination for mobile eats. U.S. News Travel recently declared Portland to have the “world’s best street food.”

On April 28, Eat Mobile, the part food festival, part cart competition, will allow attendees to sample from 50 of Willamette Week’s favorite food carts as vendors compete for the coveted Carty Award.

Eat Mobile showcases the food, music and people that make Portland’s food scene so special. This year, Willamette Week is proud to announce a partnership with the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) that will expand Eat Mobile to include food demonstrations and provide attendees with a more hands-on food experience with the Eat Mobile Culinary Science Stage.

Tickets are $18 and include samples from each of the participating carts. ” from the Willamette Week (here)


Where: OMSI parking lot

When: Sat., April 281, 6-9:30pm | $18





April 11-May 13, 2012

Four weeks of one small group show per week, with opening receptions on April 11, 18, 25, 27 and May 2, 4:00-7:00pm.

Students in the College’s BFA and Certificate programs spend their final year perfecting their craft in the creation of an original body of work. This final thesis project reflects their personal and conceptual ideas and finely tuned craftsmanship. The entire learning experience at Oregon College of Art and Craft culminates in the exhibition of their work.

image: Linnea Simmons

Also a reminder: you can view many of the student’s work and help support them put on their final group show in downtown Portland by going here:

Peter Shelton quote: “This whole figurative versus abstract stuff comes from faulty thinking …”

“Marlena Doktorczyk-Donohue: Would you concede that you create zany correlates of the body that maneuver between the abstract and the figurative?

Peter Shelton: This whole figurative versus abstract stuff comes from faulty thinking after World War II, suggesting that Modernism was fundamentally a battle between representation and abstraction. I don’t see it as one leading to the other or exceeding the other. It comes down to achieving some core expression, and the “hows” of getting there follow from that.

MDD: Do you mean that idea trumps process?

PS: Nothing is that simple. I mean that it’s inaccurate to see my work as growing linearly from abstract to real or simple to complex, or the reverse. Unlike many of my formalist predecessors, I don’t work linearly, evolving from project and situation to the next project and situation–ideas continue to circulate […]” (41)

Doktorczyk-Donohue, Marlena. “Simple Simply Isn’t.” Sculpture. April 2012. pgs. 38-45.

54. “Extra/Ordinary: Craft and Contemporary Art” by Maria Elena Buszek

This Wednesday, April 25 @ 6:30pm, Maria Elena Buszek will be giving a guest lecture for the the MFA in Applied Craft and Design Program. The event is co-sponsored with Museum of Contemporary Craft  at will be held their location at 724 NW Davis Street.

Maria Elena Buszek is a scholar, critic, curator, and Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Colorado Denver, where she teaches courses on Modern and contemporary art. Her recent publications include the books, Pin-Up Grrrls: Feminism, Sexuality, Popular Culture and Extra/ordinary: Craft and contemporary art; contributions to the anthologies It’s Time for Action (There’s No Option): About Feminism, Blaze: Discourse on Art, Women, and Feminism and Contemporary Artists; catalogue essays for numerous national and international exhibitions; and articles and criticism in such journals as Art in America; Art Journal; Photography Quarterly; and TDR: The Journal of Performance Studies. She has also been a regular contributor to the popular feminist magazine BUST since 1999.

The MFA in Applied Craft and Design is a joint degree program offered by Oregon College of Art and Craft  and Pacific Northwest College of Art.  

For this week’s library pick, we’ve selected Buszek’s extraordinary publication, Extra/ordinary: Craft and contemporary art! It is a must read for anyone interested in making and issues in the contemporary art scene today.

Here is a brief description of the work from the publisher: “Contemporary artists such as Ghada Amer and Clare Twomey have gained international reputations for work that transforms ordinary craft media and processes into extraordinary conceptual art, from Amer’s monumental stitched paintings to Twomey’s large, ceramics-based installations. Despite the amount of attention that curators and gallery owners have paid to these and many other conceptual artists who incorporate craft into their work, few art critics or scholars have explored the historical or conceptual significance of craft in contemporary art. Extra/Ordinary takes up that task. Reflecting on what craft has come to mean in recent decades, artists, critics, curators, and scholars develop theories of craft in relation to art, chronicle how fine-art institutions understand and exhibit craft media, and offer accounts of activist crafting, or craftivism. Some contributors describe generational and institutional changes under way, while others signal new directions for scholarship, considering craft in relation to queer theory, masculinity, and science. Encompassing quilts, ceramics, letterpress books, wallpaper, and textiles, and moving from well known museums to home workshops and political protests, Extra/Ordinary is an eclectic introduction to the “craft culture” referenced and celebrated by artists promoting new ways of thinking about the role of craft in contemporary art.” (found here)

Contributors include: Elissa Auther, Anthea Black, Betty Bright, Nicole Burisch, Maria Elena Buszek, Jo Dahn, M. Anna Fariello, Betsy Greer, Andrew Jackson, Janis Jefferies, Louise Mazanti, Paula Owen, Karin E. Peterson, Lacey Jane Roberts, Kirsty Robertson, Dennis Stevens, and Margaret Wertheim.

If you haven’t come across this book already, it’s time you do so now! Especially for anyone working the fields of Art and Craft today.

Also, don’t miss her lecture at the Museum of Contemporary Craft this Wednesday!