57. “The Eccentric Teapot: four hundred years of invention” by Garth Clark.

This Friday, May 18 OCAC Metals Department will be hosting their Annual Tea Party featuring teapots handcrafted by the 3rd year students from the Metals Department. In the 3rd Year Teapot Class, students design and create – through raising and forming, large scale soldering and fitting processes – a functional, sterling silver teapot in this intensive course. They make decisions about construction methods and design, choose materials for handles, and study historical and contemporary examples of teapots and other hollowware. The course, essential to the vocabulary of a metalsmith, has traditions dating back to ancient history that are still practiced today. Techniques associated with creating a hand-made teapot give students the opportunity to leave OCAC and make a living through creation of utilitarian objects.  They also come away understanding design and function and how to balance these two components.

image: Lizzy Gladstone, 2011

To celebrate this annual event and possibly entice readers interested in the subject to explore more about teapots and teapot making, the library has selected Garth Clark’s amazing book on the subject, The Eccentric Teapot: four hundred years of invention. As the stated in the book cover, this book “introduces us to some of the most sublime, outrageous, and exotic teapots ever to grace a Mad Hatter’s tea party”! There are portrait teapots of Oscar Wilde, Brooke Shields, and Queen Elizabeth. Teapots that resemble lions, tigers, and bears–Oh My! And teapots that are “so far removed from the concerns of function that they resemble nothing so much as drawings of teapots”! The result is a fun and exhilarating romp through a colorful gallery of idiosyncratic designs that begin to boggle the imagination and stretch one’s notion of the relationship between form and function! Also the concept of beauty – or what is beautiful – since many (at least IMHO) of the results are profoundly ugly but always always always provocative and thought-provoking!

 

Check it out!

Things to do in Portland this weekend: (05/11/12 – 05/13/12) “Tom Cramer & The Original Eye Candy Video Night”

TOM CRAMER : NEW WORK

“There is nothing like a Tom Cramer show. The iconic Northwest painter and sculptor heaps so much gold and silver onto his gleaming geometric compositions, it’s a wonder they aren’t bought and sold on a commodity exchange. Past shows have featured imagery inspired by trips to Indiaand Egypt, as well as waterfalls in the Columbia River Gorge, rendered with a slippery, sexualized organicism that alludes to the female body. It will be fascinating to see where Cramer takes his ever-shifting, polymorphously perverse vision this go-round. May 3-June 2″ By Richard Speer from the Willamette Week  (here)

Where:  Laura Russo Gallery | 805 NW 21st Ave

When:   Fri, May 11th

Phone: 503 226-2754

Website: http://www.laurarusso.com/

 

THE ORIGINAL EYE CANDY VIDEO NIGHT: VJ NORT, THE PHANTOM HILLBILLY

“It’s surprising what goes well with beer: Sunny Delight, Roquefort cheese, early MTV music videos. Laidback boozers’ haven Beulahland serves up a delectable dish of the latter every Sunday night, screening a hand-picked selection of finely aged pop videos to accompany your choice of friends and drinks.” By SM from the the Portland Mercury (here)

Where: Beulahland | 118 NE 28th

When: Sundays, 9pm | Free!

Phone: 503 235-2794

Website: www.beulahlandpdx.com

56. “Art School: (Propositions for the 21st Century)” edited by Steven Henry Madoff

This week, being the final week of Spring Semester and a celebratory and exciting time on campus as we congratulate our graduating students (and admire their work and talents), our thoughts have turned to the educational experience students have at OCAC and in art school more broadly. Because we’re a small, mentor-based art school, many of us have and have had the privilege to watch our students develop as makers over the course of many years. It’s certainly the most rewarding part of working at a library that tries to help serve them as they progress as makers and fine artists. With these thoughts in mind, we’ve elected to pick Art School edited by Steven Henry Madoff as this week’s library pick. It is a fascinating book — especially for anyone who has attended art school or has been involved in teaching art. Not only can it serve as a means of contextualizing an institution’s efforts, but it also helps identify a school’s successes as well as providing ideas worth considering for growth opportunities to serve the emerging artists of the 21st century!

Here’s how the publisher describes Art School: “the last explosive change in art education came nearly a century ago, when the German Bauhaus was formed. Today, dramatic changes in the art world–its increasing professionalization, the pervasive power of the art market, and fundamental shifts in art-making itself in our post-Duchampian era–combined with a revolution in information technology, raise fundamental questions about the education of today’s artists. Art School (Propositions for the 21st Century) brings together more than thirty leading international artists and art educators to reconsider the practices of art education in academic, practical, ethical, and philosophical terms. The essays in the book range over continents, histories, traditions, experiments, and fantasies of education. Accompanying the essays are conversations with such prominent artist/educators as John Baldessari, Michael Craig-Martin, Hans Haacke, and Marina Abramovic, as well as questionnaire responses from a dozen important artists–among them Mike Kelley, Ann Hamilton, Guillermo Kuitca, and Shirin Neshat–about their own experiences as students. A fascinating analysis of the architecture of major historical art schools throughout the world looks at the relationship of the principles of their designs to the principles of the pedagogy practiced within their halls. And throughout the volume, attention is paid to new initiatives and proposals about what an art school can and should be in the twenty-first century–and what it shouldn’t be. No other book on the subject covers more of the questions concerning art education today or offers more insight into the pressures, challenges, risks, and opportunities for artists and art educators in the years ahead. Contributors include: Marina Abramovic, Dennis Adams, John Baldessari, Ute Meta Bauer, Daniel Birnbaum, Saskia Bos, Tania Bruguera, Luis Camnitzer, Michael Craig-Martin, Thierry de Duve, Clémentine Deliss, Charles Esche, Liam Gillick, Boris Groys, Hans Haacke, Ann Lauterbach, Ken Lum, Steven Henry Madoff, Brendan D. Moran, Ernesto Pujol, Raqs Media Collective, Charles Renfro, Jeffrey T. Schnapp, Michael Shanks, Robert Storr, and Anton Vidokle.” From (here)

Check it out!

55. “The Everyday” edited by Stephen Johnstone.

There will be a First Thursday opening reception this Thursday, May 3rd, from 6-8:30pm, for Heidi Schwegler‘s new body of work, The Known World–a suite of objects, images, and videos–at the Chambers@916 gallery. Here’s a little background for the show from her Artist Statement:

“For the past two years, Heidi Schwegler positioned herself as a tourist in China, Iceland, Argentinaand Southern California. In exploring each environment, she became sensitive to the notion of perceptual blindness, a phenomenon which makes it difficult to understand what one sees in an environment that is very disconnected from the familiar, which can feel very alienating. To ground herself, she sought patterns in the unnoticed and discarded objects that exist on the periphery, rather than the spectacle of tourist attractions. Objects and situations that are normally overlooked, like a discarded mattress or duct tape holding down a mannequin, became instantly evocative. These experiences ultimately became the springboard for this body of work, which speaks of what is known but no longer seen.” From (here)

We are extremely excited to see this show! Last October, Heidi Schwegler started off OCAC’s lunch-time talk series with an amazing presentation about her sabbatical and artist residencies.  Most of her presentation covered her explorations and revelations about art and the everyday, and, while we did see some of the objects that she had made (which again were amazing!), there wasn’t enough time to talk about her whole body of work that came out of this period. Fortunately, we have that opportunity starting this Thursday! Don’t miss it!

The show will run through June 23, 2012.

Staying on this theme of the “everyday,” the library pick for this week is The Everyday edited by Stephen Johnstone. It would be an excellent book to check out to prepare for Schwegler’s show in order contextualize her work with respect to the ongoing collective discussion around the concept of the everyday that has been going on for well over half a century. Or, perhaps your interest might be peaked about it upon seeing The Known World.

According to the Publisher, this collection of essays, excerpts, and other writings tracks the “range of contemporary art engaged with the everyday and its antecedents in the work of Surrealists, Situationists, the Fluxus group, and conceptual and feminist artists of the 1960s and 1970s. This art shows a recognition of ordinary dignity or the accidentally miraculous, an engagement with a new kind of anthropology, an immersion in the pleasures of popular culture, or a meditation on what happens when nothing happens. The celebration of the everyday has oppositional and dissident overtones, offering a voice to the silenced and proposing possibilities for change “(from here).

Check it out!

54. “Extra/Ordinary: Craft and Contemporary Art” by Maria Elena Buszek

This Wednesday, April 25 @ 6:30pm, Maria Elena Buszek will be giving a guest lecture for the the MFA in Applied Craft and Design Program. The event is co-sponsored with Museum of Contemporary Craft  at will be held their location at 724 NW Davis Street.

Maria Elena Buszek is a scholar, critic, curator, and Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Colorado Denver, where she teaches courses on Modern and contemporary art. Her recent publications include the books, Pin-Up Grrrls: Feminism, Sexuality, Popular Culture and Extra/ordinary: Craft and contemporary art; contributions to the anthologies It’s Time for Action (There’s No Option): About Feminism, Blaze: Discourse on Art, Women, and Feminism and Contemporary Artists; catalogue essays for numerous national and international exhibitions; and articles and criticism in such journals as Art in America; Art Journal; Photography Quarterly; and TDR: The Journal of Performance Studies. She has also been a regular contributor to the popular feminist magazine BUST since 1999. www.mariabuszek.com

The MFA in Applied Craft and Design is a joint degree program offered by Oregon College of Art and Craft  and Pacific Northwest College of Art.  

For this week’s library pick, we’ve selected Buszek’s extraordinary publication, Extra/ordinary: Craft and contemporary art! It is a must read for anyone interested in making and issues in the contemporary art scene today.

Here is a brief description of the work from the publisher: “Contemporary artists such as Ghada Amer and Clare Twomey have gained international reputations for work that transforms ordinary craft media and processes into extraordinary conceptual art, from Amer’s monumental stitched paintings to Twomey’s large, ceramics-based installations. Despite the amount of attention that curators and gallery owners have paid to these and many other conceptual artists who incorporate craft into their work, few art critics or scholars have explored the historical or conceptual significance of craft in contemporary art. Extra/Ordinary takes up that task. Reflecting on what craft has come to mean in recent decades, artists, critics, curators, and scholars develop theories of craft in relation to art, chronicle how fine-art institutions understand and exhibit craft media, and offer accounts of activist crafting, or craftivism. Some contributors describe generational and institutional changes under way, while others signal new directions for scholarship, considering craft in relation to queer theory, masculinity, and science. Encompassing quilts, ceramics, letterpress books, wallpaper, and textiles, and moving from well known museums to home workshops and political protests, Extra/Ordinary is an eclectic introduction to the “craft culture” referenced and celebrated by artists promoting new ways of thinking about the role of craft in contemporary art.” (found here)

Contributors include: Elissa Auther, Anthea Black, Betty Bright, Nicole Burisch, Maria Elena Buszek, Jo Dahn, M. Anna Fariello, Betsy Greer, Andrew Jackson, Janis Jefferies, Louise Mazanti, Paula Owen, Karin E. Peterson, Lacey Jane Roberts, Kirsty Robertson, Dennis Stevens, and Margaret Wertheim.

If you haven’t come across this book already, it’s time you do so now! Especially for anyone working the fields of Art and Craft today.

Also, don’t miss her lecture at the Museum of Contemporary Craft this Wednesday!

 

 

Things to do in Portland this weekend: (04/21/12 – 04/22/12) “Record Store Day & Soul’d Out Music Festival: Wanda Jackson, Sallie Ford & The Sound Outside, and Larry & His Flask”

RECORD STORE DAY: THE HOODED HAGS, ORCA TEAM, THE SHIVAS, SURFS DRUGS, Y LA BAMBA, DEATH SONGS, NATHAN BAUMGARTNER, DJ TED, DJ BOB HAM, LISTEN LADY, MY HOLY SHOES, AND DJ HERO WORSHIP

“In Portland, Oregon, in the year 2012, the medium of the vinyl record continues to reign. There is a viable economy surrounding the buying and selling of LPs both classic and contemporary, and records are the format of choice for local bands—paralleled only, perhaps, by the cassette tape. An ever-growing body of recordings that chronicle the sounds of this time and place are available to us on vinyl, thanks in part to efforts from today’s event participants. But because of dedicated labels like Stankhouse, whose founder Nick Capello will play in the Hooded Hags, talented technicians like Robert Comitz, whose Frawg Pound recording studio is responsible for a plethora of recent releases, and shops like the Record Room that has fused business, bar, and venue, Portland doesn’t need Record Store Day. That in and of itself is a cause for celebration.” By MARANDA BISH from the Portland Mercury (here)

Where:  Record Room | 8 NE Killingsworth

When:   Sat, April 21th, 12pm.

Website:   http://www.recordroompdx.com ; http://recordstoreday.com/

Phone: 971 544-7685

 

SOUL’D OUT MUSIC FESTIVAL: WANDA JACKSON, SALLIE FORD & THE SOUND OUTSIDE, AND LARRY & HIS FLASK

“Oh my, isn’t this a delightful pairing! Bad-girl legend Wanda Jackson and the Dusty 45s meet the charmingly brassy Sallie Ford and the Sound Outside for a rousing good time at the ol’ Roseland. You bet your Fujiyama Mama, this is going to be a swinging set from some good-time gals”. By COURTNEY FERGUSON from the Portland Mercury (here)

“It’s impossible not to love Wanda Jackson. The sweet lady with the nasty voice has been in the game for well over half a century, with rockabilly, country, and gospel songs making up a very lengthy catalog. She’s a living legend, pure and simple, and there’s no excuse for missing her—particularly when she’s sharing the bill with local heroes Sallie Ford & the Sound Outside. Ford’s brassy voice and retro charm makes this a perfect double header”. By NED LANNAMANN from the Portland Mercury (here)

Where: Roseland | 8 NW 6th

When: Sat., April 21, 8pm | $20 – 30.

Website: http://www.roselandpdx.com/

 

Things to do in Portland this weekend: (04/14/12 – 04/15/12) “The Buckman Arts Show and Sell & Time and Again”

THE BUCKMAN ARTS SHOW AND SELL

“The 22nd annual Buckman Arts Show and Sell is a juried art festival featuring over 140 Pacific Northwest artists, with proceeds benefiting Buckman Arts Elementary School.” From the Portland Mercury (here)

Where:  Buckman Arts Elementary School| 320 SE 16th Avenue

When:  Fri, April 13, 5pm, and Sat, April 14th, 10am. | $5

Website:   http://buckmanelementary.org ; http://buckmanartshow.weebly.com/index.html

 

TIME AND AGAIN

“A multimedia exhibition by artist Bill Rutherford, featuring ink drawings of the black experience, sculptures of fierce women, and prints of jazz greats.” from the Portland Mercury (here)

Where: The Gallery at June Key Delta Community Center|5940 N. Albina St.

When: Fri., April 13, 4pm, Sat., April 14, 3pm, and Sun., April 15, 3pm.

Website: http://www.key-delta-living-building.com/