Simon Peers quote: “If we hadn’t made this permanent …”

[Byline: The Golden Spider Silk at the V&A showcases the world's largest pieces of cloth made entirely from spider silk].

“Simon Peers explains the spectacle before us. ‘If we hadn’t made this permanent, this silk would be webs in the wind. That’s part of the magic. Something so ephemeral and yet somehow we’ve managed to capture it.'” (24)

Jones, Denna. “World Wide Web.” Embroidery. May | June, 2012. pgs 24 – 27.

Things to do in Portland this weekend: (05/18/12 – 05/20/12) “Thesis Exhibition opening reception at the Ten Four gallery & Annual Spring Art Sale at OCAC & Oregon College of Art and Craft Graduation Commencement”

THESIS EXHIBITION OPENING RECEPTION AT THE TEN FOUR GALLERY

The Oregon College of Art and Craft (OCAC) Thesis students are putting on a group show of their own in downtown Portland, Oregon(Friday, May 18, 2012 from 6-10 pm on the corner of NW10th Avenue and Hoyt in the Pearl District).

This is a very important event for our students. Each thesis student has spent the past year creating a body of work, and this final exit show is an opportunity to display their work as an entire group, and, to a broader group visitors. You can show your support by visiting the following site (which has more details and examples of the students’ work): http://ocac2012.weebly.com

More information here: http://blog.oregonlive.com/my-portland/2012/05/ten_four_2012_ocac_exit_show_5.html

Where:  Ten Four (formerly the Attic Gallery) | NW 10th Ave. and Hoyt

When:   May 18th, 6 – 10pm. Runs through May 31st (11am – 7pm, Tuesday – Sunday).

Phone: 503 297-5544

 

ANNUAL SPRING ART SALE AT OCAC

Buy local and support Portland’s emerging artists at the annual Oregon College of Art and Craft Spring Art Sale. Explore the functional, inventive and sculptural ceramic, book arts and fibers pieces, as well as the affordable, limited edition original jewelry created by OCAC students.

Organized by faculty, students and alumni, the sale proceeds fund the participating student artists, visiting artists, and the purchase of studio equipment.

Admission is free and open to the public.

Where: Oregon College of Art and Craft | 8245 SW Barnes Rd.

When:   Saturday and Sunday, May 19th  and May 20th.

Phone: 503 297-5544

Website: http://ocac.edu/#/events/calendar/2012-may19-annual-spring-art-sale/

 

OREGON COLLEGE OF ART AND CRAFT GRADUATION COMMENCEMENT

Public Reception 2:30pm-4:30pm

The Board of Trustees of Oregon College of Art and Craft is pleased to announce commencement exercises for the graduating class of 2012 at the Jean Vollum Drawing, Painting and Photography Building on the OCAC campus.

Johanna Branson | Commencement Speaker

Johanna Branson was graduated fromWellesleyCollegewith a B.A. in art history; she received a PhD in the same field from Brown University in 1976.

Dr. Branson has published widely on modern and contemporary art. Special projects have included Seeing Through “Paradise”: Artists and the Terezin Concentration Camp, an international exhibition and catalogue; Homeland: Use and Desire, an exhibition of contemporary art from the American southwest; and essays on topics ranging from Kara Walker to Huynh Phuong Dong, a Vietcong artist and soldier.

Dr. Branson spent her professional career at the Massachusetts College of Art, first as Professor of Art History, and then as the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Dr. Branson is currently a Fellow of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design, and continues to serve as an accreditation team chair. She is also a consultant and speaker on various topics in higher education, art, and design.

Where: Oregon College of Art and Craft, Jean Vollum Drawing, Painting and Photography Building | 8245 SW Barnes Rd.

When: Saturday, May 19th, 12pm (invitation only) 2:30 – 4:30 Public Reception | Free!

Phone: 503 297-5544

Website: http://ocac.edu/#/events/calendar/2012-may19-commencement-2012/

 

Wendy Landry quote on Pamela Ritchie’s jewelry: “for the viewer, the question arises …”

“[F]or the viewer the question arises as to whether the wearer of a Ritchie ornament is being adorned and their personality expressed, or instead, whether the wearer’s body operates as a mobile gallery, showcasing Richie’s expressive material poetry, inviting approach and contemplation. Paradoxically, like much fine craft today, Ritchie’s work is more often seen in a pristine gallery setting or published photograph, without the modifying effects of wearer, garments, or other objects, or particular social contexts of use. While the gallery setting focuses the viewer’s attention on the works, it does not indicate the idiosyncratic and complex manner in which the jewelry will be incorporated into socia life.” (26)

Landry, Wendy. “Pamela Ritchie: Nova Scotia’s Intellectual Gem.” Metalsmith. Vol.32, No.2, 2012. pg 22-31

57. “The Eccentric Teapot: four hundred years of invention” by Garth Clark.

This Friday, May 18 OCAC Metals Department will be hosting their Annual Tea Party featuring teapots handcrafted by the 3rd year students from the Metals Department. In the 3rd Year Teapot Class, students design and create – through raising and forming, large scale soldering and fitting processes – a functional, sterling silver teapot in this intensive course. They make decisions about construction methods and design, choose materials for handles, and study historical and contemporary examples of teapots and other hollowware. The course, essential to the vocabulary of a metalsmith, has traditions dating back to ancient history that are still practiced today. Techniques associated with creating a hand-made teapot give students the opportunity to leave OCAC and make a living through creation of utilitarian objects.  They also come away understanding design and function and how to balance these two components.

image: Lizzy Gladstone, 2011

To celebrate this annual event and possibly entice readers interested in the subject to explore more about teapots and teapot making, the library has selected Garth Clark’s amazing book on the subject, The Eccentric Teapot: four hundred years of invention. As the stated in the book cover, this book “introduces us to some of the most sublime, outrageous, and exotic teapots ever to grace a Mad Hatter’s tea party”! There are portrait teapots of Oscar Wilde, Brooke Shields, and Queen Elizabeth. Teapots that resemble lions, tigers, and bears–Oh My! And teapots that are “so far removed from the concerns of function that they resemble nothing so much as drawings of teapots”! The result is a fun and exhilarating romp through a colorful gallery of idiosyncratic designs that begin to boggle the imagination and stretch one’s notion of the relationship between form and function! Also the concept of beauty – or what is beautiful – since many (at least IMHO) of the results are profoundly ugly but always always always provocative and thought-provoking!

 

Check it out!

Andre Woodward Quote: “My work is definitely time-based. There are about three different…”

Michael Amy: Your work is also about time.

Andre Woodward: My work is definitely time-based. There are about three different timelines going on in each piece. The tree grows. In the sound pieces, you need to consider the duration of the soundtrack, and in the pieces that incorporate lighting systems, you have that time going on as well. And then you have the time during which you are interacting with the work. I produce sculptural work because, with sculpture, there is you and the piece. There is not a flat divide—you and the piece occupy the same space. Once you realize that the sculpture is alive, something happens. You start to be sympathetic to the life-force. It isn’t merely an object. It’s a living thing. (29)

Amy, Michael. “A Living Thing Shouldn’t Be There: a Conversation with Andre Woodward.” Sculpture. Vol. 31, No. 4, May, 2012. pgs 26- 33.

56. “Art School: (Propositions for the 21st Century)” edited by Steven Henry Madoff

This week, being the final week of Spring Semester and a celebratory and exciting time on campus as we congratulate our graduating students (and admire their work and talents), our thoughts have turned to the educational experience students have at OCAC and in art school more broadly. Because we’re a small, mentor-based art school, many of us have and have had the privilege to watch our students develop as makers over the course of many years. It’s certainly the most rewarding part of working at a library that tries to help serve them as they progress as makers and fine artists. With these thoughts in mind, we’ve elected to pick Art School edited by Steven Henry Madoff as this week’s library pick. It is a fascinating book — especially for anyone who has attended art school or has been involved in teaching art. Not only can it serve as a means of contextualizing an institution’s efforts, but it also helps identify a school’s successes as well as providing ideas worth considering for growth opportunities to serve the emerging artists of the 21st century!

Here’s how the publisher describes Art School: “the last explosive change in art education came nearly a century ago, when the German Bauhaus was formed. Today, dramatic changes in the art world–its increasing professionalization, the pervasive power of the art market, and fundamental shifts in art-making itself in our post-Duchampian era–combined with a revolution in information technology, raise fundamental questions about the education of today’s artists. Art School (Propositions for the 21st Century) brings together more than thirty leading international artists and art educators to reconsider the practices of art education in academic, practical, ethical, and philosophical terms. The essays in the book range over continents, histories, traditions, experiments, and fantasies of education. Accompanying the essays are conversations with such prominent artist/educators as John Baldessari, Michael Craig-Martin, Hans Haacke, and Marina Abramovic, as well as questionnaire responses from a dozen important artists–among them Mike Kelley, Ann Hamilton, Guillermo Kuitca, and Shirin Neshat–about their own experiences as students. A fascinating analysis of the architecture of major historical art schools throughout the world looks at the relationship of the principles of their designs to the principles of the pedagogy practiced within their halls. And throughout the volume, attention is paid to new initiatives and proposals about what an art school can and should be in the twenty-first century–and what it shouldn’t be. No other book on the subject covers more of the questions concerning art education today or offers more insight into the pressures, challenges, risks, and opportunities for artists and art educators in the years ahead. Contributors include: Marina Abramovic, Dennis Adams, John Baldessari, Ute Meta Bauer, Daniel Birnbaum, Saskia Bos, Tania Bruguera, Luis Camnitzer, Michael Craig-Martin, Thierry de Duve, Clémentine Deliss, Charles Esche, Liam Gillick, Boris Groys, Hans Haacke, Ann Lauterbach, Ken Lum, Steven Henry Madoff, Brendan D. Moran, Ernesto Pujol, Raqs Media Collective, Charles Renfro, Jeffrey T. Schnapp, Michael Shanks, Robert Storr, and Anton Vidokle.” From (here)

Check it out!

Things to do in Portland this weekend: (05/04/12 – 05/06/12) “Cinco De Lebowski VII Festival & Object Stories”

CINCO DE LEBOWSKI VII FESTIVAL

“An annual tradition for Big Lebowski lovers and White Russian-starved alcoholics alike, Cinco de Lebowski—hosted by local podcasters cortandfatboy—screens the Coen brothers’ classic film, encourages Dude-approved costumes, and offers live music from Here Come Dots and Rich Layton and the Troublemakers.” By EH from the Portland Mercury (here)

Where:  Bagdad Theater |3702SE Hawthorne

When:   Fri, May 4th, 8pm. | $3-10

Phone: 225-5555

Website:   www.mcmenamins.com/219-bagdad-theater-pub-home

 

OBJECT STORIES

“A collaboration with the Northwest Film Center, Miracle Theatre Group, and Write Around Portland, Object Stories addresses the subtle but vital power of an object to compel a narrative and provides an interactive platform meant to transform the public’s perception of “the archive” and their relationship to it. The show includes a soundproof booth, where you can bring in a personal item to speak about, having your voice recorded and photo taken, and then have your story added to the museum’s archives.” from the the Portland Mercury (here)

Where: Portland Art Museum| 1219 SW Park

When: ongoing

Phone: 503 226-2811

Website: http://www.portlandartmuseum.org ; http://www.objectstories.pam.org/collection