Good Reads

As a library, I think it is important to advertise avenues for book lovers. If you like books and you like libraries then you have probably already heard of good reads. In case you haven’t, this is our Christmas gift to you. Enjoy!

Good Reads is an online social platform for people to share and build book lists. It is one of the worlds largest sites for book recommendations and book lists. The site allows you to build book wish lists and reading lists, as well as keep tabs on books you’re in the process of reading. You can look at specific genres you are interested in reading, collaborate in book clubs. You can even choose to judge a book by its cover if you wish and search one of the many image based lists (including “Best cover of all time”, “Breathtaking book covers” or “Horrible covers”). Good Reads even has a focus for academic life or the art world. Here is a book list for some of OCAC’s craft departments. Check them out. If you find a book you really like, please come into the library and we will try to track it down for you.

Book Arts: Not represented, create one!

Ceramics:
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/1211.Best_books_on_Ceramic_Arts

Drawing:
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/42202.Art_Books_for_Serious_Students
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/22555.The_Art_of_Animation

Fibers:
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/9483.Fiction_for_the_Fiber_Artist
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/2369.Garment_and_Textile
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/16346.Best_Practical_Historic_Costuming_Books

General:
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/28962.Books_for_Wildlife_Artists
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/13574.Artist_Biographies
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/27517.Art_themed_novels

Metals:
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/24918.Best_Jewelry_and_Metalsmithing_Books

Painting:
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/7620.In_a_Painter_s_Studio

Photo:
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/15034.Photo_Comics
https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/9316.Photographer_s_Education

Wood: Not represented, make your own list!

Wendy Landry quote on Pamela Ritchie’s jewelry: “for the viewer, the question arises …”

“[F]or the viewer the question arises as to whether the wearer of a Ritchie ornament is being adorned and their personality expressed, or instead, whether the wearer’s body operates as a mobile gallery, showcasing Richie’s expressive material poetry, inviting approach and contemplation. Paradoxically, like much fine craft today, Ritchie’s work is more often seen in a pristine gallery setting or published photograph, without the modifying effects of wearer, garments, or other objects, or particular social contexts of use. While the gallery setting focuses the viewer’s attention on the works, it does not indicate the idiosyncratic and complex manner in which the jewelry will be incorporated into socia life.” (26)

Landry, Wendy. “Pamela Ritchie: Nova Scotia’s Intellectual Gem.” Metalsmith. Vol.32, No.2, 2012. pg 22-31

Andre Woodward Quote: “My work is definitely time-based. There are about three different…”

Michael Amy: Your work is also about time.

Andre Woodward: My work is definitely time-based. There are about three different timelines going on in each piece. The tree grows. In the sound pieces, you need to consider the duration of the soundtrack, and in the pieces that incorporate lighting systems, you have that time going on as well. And then you have the time during which you are interacting with the work. I produce sculptural work because, with sculpture, there is you and the piece. There is not a flat divide—you and the piece occupy the same space. Once you realize that the sculpture is alive, something happens. You start to be sympathetic to the life-force. It isn’t merely an object. It’s a living thing. (29)

Amy, Michael. “A Living Thing Shouldn’t Be There: a Conversation with Andre Woodward.” Sculpture. Vol. 31, No. 4, May, 2012. pgs 26- 33.

56. “Art School: (Propositions for the 21st Century)” edited by Steven Henry Madoff

This week, being the final week of Spring Semester and a celebratory and exciting time on campus as we congratulate our graduating students (and admire their work and talents), our thoughts have turned to the educational experience students have at OCAC and in art school more broadly. Because we’re a small, mentor-based art school, many of us have and have had the privilege to watch our students develop as makers over the course of many years. It’s certainly the most rewarding part of working at a library that tries to help serve them as they progress as makers and fine artists. With these thoughts in mind, we’ve elected to pick Art School edited by Steven Henry Madoff as this week’s library pick. It is a fascinating book — especially for anyone who has attended art school or has been involved in teaching art. Not only can it serve as a means of contextualizing an institution’s efforts, but it also helps identify a school’s successes as well as providing ideas worth considering for growth opportunities to serve the emerging artists of the 21st century!

Here’s how the publisher describes Art School: “the last explosive change in art education came nearly a century ago, when the German Bauhaus was formed. Today, dramatic changes in the art world–its increasing professionalization, the pervasive power of the art market, and fundamental shifts in art-making itself in our post-Duchampian era–combined with a revolution in information technology, raise fundamental questions about the education of today’s artists. Art School (Propositions for the 21st Century) brings together more than thirty leading international artists and art educators to reconsider the practices of art education in academic, practical, ethical, and philosophical terms. The essays in the book range over continents, histories, traditions, experiments, and fantasies of education. Accompanying the essays are conversations with such prominent artist/educators as John Baldessari, Michael Craig-Martin, Hans Haacke, and Marina Abramovic, as well as questionnaire responses from a dozen important artists–among them Mike Kelley, Ann Hamilton, Guillermo Kuitca, and Shirin Neshat–about their own experiences as students. A fascinating analysis of the architecture of major historical art schools throughout the world looks at the relationship of the principles of their designs to the principles of the pedagogy practiced within their halls. And throughout the volume, attention is paid to new initiatives and proposals about what an art school can and should be in the twenty-first century–and what it shouldn’t be. No other book on the subject covers more of the questions concerning art education today or offers more insight into the pressures, challenges, risks, and opportunities for artists and art educators in the years ahead. Contributors include: Marina Abramovic, Dennis Adams, John Baldessari, Ute Meta Bauer, Daniel Birnbaum, Saskia Bos, Tania Bruguera, Luis Camnitzer, Michael Craig-Martin, Thierry de Duve, Clémentine Deliss, Charles Esche, Liam Gillick, Boris Groys, Hans Haacke, Ann Lauterbach, Ken Lum, Steven Henry Madoff, Brendan D. Moran, Ernesto Pujol, Raqs Media Collective, Charles Renfro, Jeffrey T. Schnapp, Michael Shanks, Robert Storr, and Anton Vidokle.” From (here)

Check it out!

Glenn Adamson Quote: “Of course, big corporations are just as adept…”

“Of course, big corporations are just as adept at manipulating the rhetoric of sustainability as young makers. But craft does have a special advantage. In the effort to promote more self-aware ways of living, the simple act of making by hand signifies direct engagement with an object, and therefore a degree of personal responsibility. Certainly, not every craft object is made sustainably; we have to get real about that. But the lesson of postmodernism is that the power of the image is not to be denied. It’s not enough to make things responsibly; we need to call on mass media to constantly remind the public of what responsibility might look like.” (023)

An excerpt from Glenn Adamson’s response to the questions: Is there a sustainability aesthetic? If so, how would you describe it, and which artists exemplify it?

“The Big Questions with Glenn Adamson: What Responsibility Might Look Like.” American Craft. Vol. 72, No. 02, April/May 2012. pg 023.

Support the OCAC Thesis Students’ Exit Show!!

The Oregon College of Art and Craft (OCAC) Thesis students are putting on a group show of their own in downtown Portland, Oregon (Friday, May 18, 2012 from 6-10 pm on the corner of NW 10th Avenue and Hoyt in the Pearl District)… and they need our help!

This is a very important event for our students. Each thesis student has spent the past year creating a body of work, and this final exit show is an opportunity to display their work as an entire group, and, to a broader group visitors. You can show your support by visiting the following site (which has more details): http://ocac2012.weebly.com

Triple Candie quote: “The movement is a topical subject and one we believe in …”

“Becky Huff Hunter: You appropriated the language of the Occupy movement to demonstrate that Arte Povera is now “the property of the 1%.” Why did you choose to align yourselves with this movement?

Triple Candie: The movement is a topical subject and one we believe in. Most art that is deemed culturally significant is the property of, or controlled by, a wealthy micro-sliver of the population. For art (with a small a) to become Art (with a capital a), it must enter this
territory of privilege. This process is fundamental. Arte Povera has been thusly transformed, its dirt and stones now sleeping under bulletproof glass. It is a wonderful illustration of an age-old problem that has become only more acute in our lifetime.” (12)

Hunter, Becky Huff. “Infectious Sovereignty: editorializing the exhibition.” Art Papers. March/April, 2012. pgs 10-15.